No, No, Corporations are Responsible for Increasing Prosumption and Growing Unemployment

While people, in the role as prosumers, certainly are a cause of unemployment, focusing only, or even mainly, on their role in this is a form of “blaming the victim”. The fact is that it is various organizations, especially profit-making businesses, that have systematically, and at an accelerating rate, replaced paid employees with unpaid prosumers. It is simply a no-brainer for a company to create systems that lead prosumers to perform what had been paid labor. Once prosumers have been led in that direction, it is much easier for companies to coerce them into doing that work, often by leaving them little, and in some cases no, choice.

Consider the self-checkout lines at supermarkets. This is a clear case of prosumption with prosumers not only shopping (a form of labor) for their food, but also being asked to do the work of the checkout person and the bagger, to say nothing of the old-time grocer who actually retrieved food items for consumers. Grocers have long since all but disappeared being replaced, at least in part, by workers who stock supermarket shelves and prosumers who retrieve their own food. We are now witnessing a similar decline in checkout persons and baggers as prosumers take on their work in addition to that of the grocer.

When they were first introduced, self-checkout lanes were one-off experiments standing alongside much more numerous traditional checkout lanes. People were lured to the new-fangled checkout system by the novelty of the new technology as well as their growing interest in doing, and their increasing ability to do, things on their own. The latter, of course, was largely traceable to operating on one’s own on the increasingly omnipresent Internet. Over time, and as people grew increasingly comfortable with the self-checkout system, more and more lanes were devoted to it with the result that there were fewer alternatives to self-checkout lanes and the dwindling number of them were often over-crowded. This, in turn, drove even more people to the self-checkout lanes. The result is that using a self-checkout lane has become less of an option and increasingly a necessity.

In other cases, there is no alternative to being a prosumer; to being both a consumer and performing the labor once handled by paid workers. There are no waiters and buspersons in fast food restaurants. If one chooses to eat there, one must do the labor performed by such workers at traditional restaurants.

However, the most interesting examples come from the newer settings that are set up from the get-go to force people to be prosumers. For example, if people choose to shop at Amazon.com, they must prosume because there are no paid employees present to do the work for them. It is true that employees created the Amazon system and maintain it, and that the system does a good deal of the work for prosumers, but they are on their own when making a purchase on Amazon.com. In this case, it isn’t that prosumers replace paid workers; they never existed in the first place. Rather such locales, and they are increasingly the norm, are created from inception to rely on the unpaid labor of prosumers rather than the paid work of employees.

Better to blame the companies that institute systems that lead, even force, people to be prosumers than to blame prosumers who increasingly have little choice in the matter.

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